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01.08.16

Pantone Color of the Year 2016: Rose Quartz and Serenity

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Pantone Color of the Year 2016

 

Happy New Year! Walker Zanger is starting off 2016 with a social media color chart theme inspired by the Pantone Color of the Year. Last year’s color was Marsala and the year before Radiant Orchid.

Pantone’s color of the year for 2016 is actually two shades: Rose Quartz and Serenity. During today’s turbulent time, consumers are looking for mindfulness and tranquility in colors.  According to Pantone, these are “welcoming colors that psychologically fulfill our yearning for reassurance and security.” The balance between the rose and blue tones reflect connection, order and inner peace.

These two colors are often seen together in the expanse of the sky during a sunset or sunrise. The choice of these colors together is also a symbol of the fluidity of today’s changing times. Today we are experiencing a blur in the construct of gender, which impacts fashion as well as interior design. Using two colors as the Color of the Year reflects the open-minded nature of today’s generation and the willingness to see it as expression. Today’s generation is also more open to an exchange of digital information that challenges traditional ideas, such as one shade for the color of the year.

 

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Statement from Pantone Executive Director

Sit back, and relax with hues of baby pink and pastel blue in these images of Rose Quartz and Serenity from our pinboard showcasing “Rose Quartz and Serenity”…

 

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Rust Series

 

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Serenity Butterfly among Rose Quartz Cherry Blossoms

 

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Vogue editorial ‘Hollywoodland’ with Karen Elson styled by Grace Coddington

 

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Rose Quartz and Serenity seats

 

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Pale Pink from Apartment Therapy

 

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Pantone Rose Quartz Kitchen

 

Check out our Rose Quartz and Serenity pinboard by clicking on the widget below!

pinboard

01.05.16

Ask Bob. Rectified Porcelain.

21 collage

 

Q: I am interested in a 21 Cemento porcelain tile floor for my high rise condo in San Francisco. I have visited your showroom in the design center in San Francisco where they have the 24″ x 47″ tiles with very tight grout lines installed on the floor in a straight grid pattern. This is the look I want. The designer helping me said this isn’t possible because porcelain tiles bow in the middle and must be installed with a 30% offset and wider grout lines. She suggested that I contact you for technical assistance. Very discouraged, I took to the internet, and now know about “lippage” and rectified vs. non-rectified tiles. Are these 21 tiles rectified? Should I give up on this beautiful floor? I don’t like the offset look. All the pictures on your site show the tiles in a straight grid pattern. I would love your advice. Thank you!

Best, Dale

 

A: Hello Dale,

Your contractor would be correct in her statement if you were to install our 21 Cemento Porcelain Tiles using a running bond pattern.  However, a straight set grid pattern will not present a problem with a 1/16′ grout joint width because the apex of the bowing in each tile will align with the bowing of the adjacent tiles on either side.  As a result, lippage will not be an issue.  Regarding 21 Cemento tiles being rectified, they are that way because they are uniform in facial dimension.

01.04.16

Mosaic Monday…The Serenity of Rose Quartz.

12.21.15

Mosaic Monday…Christmas Wish List.

12.16.15

Ask Bob. Crackle Maintenance.

Q: I have installed a Walker Zanger crackle tile which the entire surface of the tile is covered in the white material that the tile is made from. It is a shower stall. I’m guessing the water has penetrated the tile and reacted to it. What are your thoughts?

Thanks, Mike

A: Hello Mike,

A crackle glaze tile requires sealing prior to grouting and then the grout must be sealed after it is fully cured (to be safe) after 72 hours.  Then, depending on the amount of usage the shower gets, the tiles must be resealed as part of the routine maintenance program.  For a master bathroom shower you may need to reseal every year where as a guest bath shower may be every 3-5 years.  The white buildup on the tile’s surface is most likely not particles from the tile’s clay body but it may be grout residue or efflorescence emanating from the thin-set and mortar bed. Hope this helped and thanks for your question!

All photo images and text are the property of Walker Zanger. Please do not use for commercial purposes without permission. You are welcome to repost. copyright 2014.

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